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20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed, resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. t
, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty sign
of the world's great religions: buddhism, the fourth largest religion in the world. he was the son of a king, a pampered prince who abandoned a life of pleasure to seek enlightenment. >> even buddha himself in order to get final enlightenment need hard work. >> gere: it was an arduous spiritual journey. >> he was eating one grain of rice per day. he was standing on one foot. he was sleeping on nails. >> gere: meditating
of the basic values, like freedom of expression, religion, so we are going to fight it, and one of our first platforms will be to abolish or of the very least amend the constitution. -- or at the very least abolished -- amend the constitution. >> they expect the crisis to end soon. >> it is not against the regime. that is very bad for the country -- country. we are losing almost 50 million american dollars a day, and the egyptian government is not strong enough. >> many egyptians are tired of the political upheaval. looking to bring civility. others are afraid the country could be moving towards an islamic state. egypt is deeply divided about its future. bbc news, cairo. >> the former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is said to be spending christmas in the hospital. he was admitted two weeks ago because of a lung infection, but while in the hospital, he was also treated for gallstones, and doctors say he is not quite ready to be allowed home. we resent this update from johannesburg. >> nelson mandela was admitted to the hospital, and now, it appears he will not be discharged in tim
people, as he put it, to build a more fraternal society, allowing religions to make their contribution. the vatican's relations with beijing reached a new low earlier this year with the detention by chinese authorities of a new roman catholic bishop of shanghai, which had previously than approved. he gave his blessing in 65 languages. [cheers and applause] >> although he sometimes walks with a stick and is tushed on a traveling platform to save his strength when he fish yates at masses, pope benedict wears his 85 years relatively well. at times his voice may be slightly hoarse, but his determination to continue in office is unshaken by increasing age. "bbc news," rome. >> at least 27 people have been killed in a plane vash in southern kazakhstan. it was considering -- carrying several people. they said the plane had up and only fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell
and said it is as much about economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed civiliani protects the mon
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary. so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. one of the most dangerous parts in that constitution, that it opened the door for many controversial school of religious thoughts to seep through the legislative process and undermine the authority of the judiciary. >> warner: the constitution was approved by 64% of the national vote, but only a third of eligible voters had turned out. and in major cities like cairo, majorities voted "no." this morning, those divisions were still apparent in cairo. >> ( translated ): it will certainly lead to stability. we can now begin to move forward. investment can begin to come into egypt. what more do people want? >> ( translated ): we are very sad and we never wanted the situation to be this way. we never wanted just one political group to rule. we wanted there to be unity. >> warner: for now, legislative power rests with the country's upper house of parliament, which is dominated by islamists. it was seated today. >> ( translated ): with regards >> warner: parliame
religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had completely different ideas. >> there was no one that could have
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)